Eyelet template

On my kirtles I follow Festive Attyre’s “The Zen of Spiral Lacing” guide for spiral lacing hole placement. To do that I created a quick-and-dirty template which makes marking eyelets much easier.

This is an index card which is marked in 3/4″ increments except at the end which is 1/2 that. Above these marks, 1/4″ from the edge of the card I punched holes in the card. This makes marking of eyelets much easier than trying to mark with a simple ruler.

The top awl is a commercial awl I bought from JoAnne’s. It’s nice.. but it make TINY eyelets. I suppose if I’d had a good aiglet on the laces this wouldn’t be an issue.. but I didn’t have a good aiglet and it was an issue. So my husband, who loves me very much, jimmy’d around in the garage and came up with a bigger awl for me to use to make eyelets. The new awl is a large diameter screwdriver which he ground down to a point. The eyelets on the new dress are HUGE in comparison to the old.

Organizing my fabric stash

My stash organization

My stash organization

I use 4×6 cards to track my fabric stash. Each card corresponds to one hank of fabric and allows me to see if I have enough fabric for a project without having to actually pull the fabric out. I record the fiber content, weight, color, yardage and (if I remember) how much I paid for it originally. I also staple a fabric sample to the card. As I use fabric I update the yardage to the new measurements. If I use all of a fabric then I throw away the card.

Even hand stitching

clever_stitching Clever hack to keep your stitches even.

By making 2 marks on the side of your thumb, and moving your thumb along as you work, you have a built in gauge for exact stitch length, without marking up your fabric.

PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS NOT MY THUMB NOR MY IDEA. I’ve tried to find the original source to no avail. I truly would like to give credit where credit is due, but falling short of that I’ll happily share a truly clever idea.